Stored Labels

Anything to do with Port.
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djewesbury
Graham’s 1970
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Stored Labels

Post by djewesbury » 16:04 Mon 30 Jun 2014

A fellow :tpf: user and I might have recently bought a Scottish bottling of a 1970 port that's been lying in bond in the bottler's store since 1972. We were informed that the labels were not affixed at the time and are in the merchant's library; they can be affixed prior to delivery or alternatively taken separately.

Has anyone come across this before? Is this quite a common occurrence? Perhaps it's not so often that one finds bottles that have been in store with their original bottlers since shipping and bottling. Will I say 'bottle' once more just to amplify the strangeness of that last sentence? No, I bottled it.
Daniel J.
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CaliforniaBrad
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Stored Labels

Post by CaliforniaBrad » 08:11 Tue 01 Jul 2014

Wow, I'm not sure whether that's cool or slightly worrying. Obviously it's a reputable bottler or you wouldn't be buying, but my skeptical American side would eat at me a bit if I didn't know them well.

However, skeptical me aside, that's actually pretty awesome, I've only heard of such things for ex-cellars bottles from the producers themselves. I always figured most of the bottlers would have labelled and sold off the last of their pre-bottling imports long ago.

Corrected for spelling.

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DRT
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by DRT » 09:16 Tue 01 Jul 2014

Prior to the mid 1970s it was standard practice for shippers to provide the corks and labels with each pipe sold.
"The first duty of Port is to be red"
Ernest H. Cockburn

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uncle tom
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by uncle tom » 12:55 Tue 01 Jul 2014

I don't find this at all suspicious, as it is highly likely that the capsules will be embossed to confirm the ID, and labels do not survive well when bottles are bin stored.

But heck! I am surprised that over 40 years after UK bottling ended, a merchant still has the labels neatly filed away..
I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I shall be sober and you will still be ugly - W.S. Churchill

PhilW
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by PhilW » 14:44 Tue 01 Jul 2014

uncle tom wrote:But heck! I am surprised that over 40 years after UK bottling ended, a merchant still has the labels neatly filed away..
So were they :)

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uncle tom
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by uncle tom » 11:09 Mon 07 Jul 2014

Well, I can go one better..

The offley '63 magnums that are going under the hammer tomorrow have clearly embossed capsules, and were supplied with a stack of labels..
I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I shall be sober and you will still be ugly - W.S. Churchill

John Owlett
Cockburn’s Special Reserve
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by John Owlett » 16:48 Wed 06 Jul 2016

Desultory browsing of the website yesterday evening led me to this thread ... for which I do have relevant experience.

One of the wine merchants I use occasionally is Whighams of Ayr. Nowadays it is part of the Corney and Barrow organisation -- and on the ground floor it is a modern wine shop. But the underground cellar is 250 years old and an Aladdin's Cave. Whighams claims that in the late 18th century it was certainly visited regularly by one Robert Burns, a local excise man and a friend of the proprietor. This is probably true, since it seems at times that Burns was a good friend of every supplier of alcoholic drink in the South West of Scotland!

When I was shown the cellar some years ago, I was told that up to the 1970s wine arrived in casks and was bottled on the premises (there was an elderly cork flogger in one corner), but not labelled ... the humidity of the cellar was good for corks but bad for labels. The bottles were stored in bins -- sections of the floor against the wall delimited by wooden boards -- the ones they showed me contained several hundred bottles, all belonging to Whighams customers. When a customer opted to take delivery of his or her wine, the bottles would be wiped clean and labelled.

Later,

John

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jdaw1
Cockburn 1900
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by jdaw1 » 08:42 Thu 07 Jul 2016

John Owlett wrote:is Whighams of Ayr. Nowadays it is part of the Corney and Barrow organisation -- and on the ground floor it is a modern wine shop. But the underground cellar is 250 years old and an Aladdin's Cave. Whighams claims that in the late 18th century it
Must ask: are there old price catalogues? Cellar books?

John Owlett
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by John Owlett » 15:14 Thu 07 Jul 2016

jdaw1 wrote:Must ask: are there old price catalogues? Cellar books?
Sorry, Julian, I don't know. I was just a customer being given the "Tour of the Cellar". They gave me a copy of their 2007-08 Wine List, which I suppose is an old price catalogue within the meaning of the act, but I doubt whether it is what you want.

They sell me wine, but haven't told me where, and whether, the wine labels are kept. They haven't even told me whether the splashes of white paint are vinyl or acrylic.

John

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AHB
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Re: Stored Labels

Post by AHB » 20:53 Thu 07 Jul 2016

John Owlett wrote:They haven't even told me whether the splashes of white paint are vinyl or acrylic.
Surely neither! A proper wine merchant will only use whitewash.

(But I admit I am not a proper wine merchant - I tend to use Dulux white matt when I have to re-smit (smite?) an old bottle.)
Top Ports in 2019 (so far): Cockburn 1947 and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
2018 Ports of the year: São Leonardo 1927 White Port (Bottled 2018), Quinta do Noval Nacional 1994

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