Port and literature

Anything to do with Port.
User avatar
AHB
Fonseca 1963
Posts: 12691
Joined: 13:41 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Berkshire, UK

Re: Port and literature

Post by AHB » 15:34 Fri 13 Jan 2017

djewesbury wrote:... I'd have murdered the lot of them, starting with Harriet.
Rather a harsh critique on poor Harriet Walters' efforts in the 1987 TV adaptation. Personally I thought she was rather good and played off Edward Petherbridge's foppish twit better than most would have been able to.
Top Ports in 2019: Niepoort VV (1960s bottling) and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
Top Ports in 2020 (so far): Croft 1945 and Niepoort VV (1960s bottling)

User avatar
djewesbury
Graham’s 1970
Posts: 8159
Joined: 20:01 Mon 31 Dec 2012
Location: Belfast
Contact:

Re: Port and literature

Post by djewesbury » 15:35 Fri 13 Jan 2017

AHB wrote:
djewesbury wrote:... I'd have murdered the lot of them, starting with Harriet.
Rather a harsh critique on poor Harriet Walters' efforts in the 1987 TV adaptation. Personally I thought she was rather good and played off Edward Petherbridge's foppish twit better than most would have been able to.
Ian Carmichael was better. On the wireless.Those TV adaptations look horribly dated now.
Daniel J.
delete.. delete.. *sigh*.. delete...

User avatar
AHB
Fonseca 1963
Posts: 12691
Joined: 13:41 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Berkshire, UK

Re: Port and literature

Post by AHB » 16:09 Fri 13 Jan 2017

djewesbury wrote:
AHB wrote:
djewesbury wrote:... I'd have murdered the lot of them, starting with Harriet.
Rather a harsh critique on poor Harriet Walters' efforts in the 1987 TV adaptation. Personally I thought she was rather good and played off Edward Petherbridge's foppish twit better than most would have been able to.
Ian Carmichael was better. On the wireless.Those TV adaptations look horribly dated now.
I agree with the view that wireless is more timeless than TV. Which leads me to wonder whether Paul Temple ever indulged in decent Port. I do recall he and Steve fumbling around in a lightless cellar in one story and discovering by touch some Champagne, which they opened and which he recognised by taste and smell.

I'll need to listen to the stories again to see whether Port is mentioned.
Top Ports in 2019: Niepoort VV (1960s bottling) and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
Top Ports in 2020 (so far): Croft 1945 and Niepoort VV (1960s bottling)

LGTrotter
Dalva Golden White Colheita 1952
Posts: 3707
Joined: 17:45 Fri 19 Oct 2012
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: Port and literature

Post by LGTrotter » 22:02 Fri 13 Jan 2017

AHB wrote:
djewesbury wrote:... I'd have murdered the lot of them, starting with Harriet.
Rather a harsh critique on poor Harriet Walters' efforts in the 1987 TV adaptation. Personally I thought she was rather good and played off Edward Petherbridge's foppish twit better than most would have been able to.
I am with Daniel on this one, assuming he means Harriet Vane, rather than Walters. I think one of the main problems with "Busman's Honeymoon" was that it was written as a stage play and then converted into a novel. If Daniel means Harriet Walters then I am with Alex. Either way Ian Carmichael is the man for me.

PhilW
Quinta do Vesuvio 1994
Posts: 3014
Joined: 14:22 Wed 15 Dec 2010
Location: Near Cambridge, UK

Re: Port and literature

Post by PhilW » 21:58 Wed 15 Feb 2017

Having just watched the film "Remains of the day", I noted the butler removed a bottle of Dow 1913 from the cellar. Fortunately I was able to check in "Port Vintages" to confirm that no such vintage appears to exist. Does anyone know whether the bottle is mentioned in the original book?

PopulusTremula
Warre’s Traditional LBV
Posts: 326
Joined: 17:45 Mon 23 May 2011

Re: Port and literature

Post by PopulusTremula » 05:13 Wed 05 Apr 2017

In Our Game by Le Carré:

I remember thinking, as the thousand-voiced choir of angels struck up inside my head, that if you're celebrating your emergence from the black light, a bottle of '55 Cheval Blanc and a large dose of Graham's '27 port make an appropriately celestial accompaniment.

Great author, wonderful command of English. And the yarns aren't half bad either.

User avatar
AHB
Fonseca 1963
Posts: 12691
Joined: 13:41 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Berkshire, UK

Re: Port and literature

Post by AHB » 14:52 Sat 31 Mar 2018

Dorothy Sayers again (she clearly liked her Port). In the Lord Peter Wimsey story The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club he is interrupted by Murbles while drinking Cockburn 1886 and they share several glasses together.

Daniel did make a passing reference to this fact but didn’t include it in this thread.
Top Ports in 2019: Niepoort VV (1960s bottling) and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
Top Ports in 2020 (so far): Croft 1945 and Niepoort VV (1960s bottling)

User avatar
AHB
Fonseca 1963
Posts: 12691
Joined: 13:41 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Berkshire, UK

Re: Port and literature

Post by AHB » 23:28 Fri 20 Dec 2019

Another reference from Dorothy Sayers. In her first book featuring Lord Peter Wimsey, Whose Body, Lord Peter’s valet, Bunter, is required to obtain some information from the manservant of the chief suspect. He does this by raiding Lord Peter’s Port cellar and drinks a bottle of “the old Port”, which he later identifies as Cockburn 1868. The book also clearly puts the events in the year 1920, so being roughly the same as drinking Fonseca 1966 or Noval 1967 today.
Top Ports in 2019: Niepoort VV (1960s bottling) and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
Top Ports in 2020 (so far): Croft 1945 and Niepoort VV (1960s bottling)

User avatar
jdaw1
Cockburn 1900
Posts: 21935
Joined: 15:03 Thu 21 Jun 2007
Location: London
Contact:

Re: Port and literature

Post by jdaw1 » 00:07 Sat 21 Dec 2019

AHB wrote:
23:28 Fri 20 Dec 2019
Another reference from Dorothy Sayers. In her first book featuring Lord Peter Wimsey, Whose Body, Lord Peter’s valet, Bunter, is required to obtain some information from the manservant of the chief suspect. He does this by raiding Lord Peter’s Port cellar and drinks a bottle of “the old Port”, which he later identifies as Cockburn 1868. The book also clearly puts the events in the year 1920, so being roughly the same as drinking Fonseca 1966 or Noval 1967 today.
No: ’66 is a superior vintage to ’68.

Post Reply