Little known port identification

Anything to do with Port.
Post Reply
Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 20:03 Fri 05 Feb 2021

Hi folks,

After purchasing a bottle of port recently I wanted to find more about it buf after searching online I have drawn a blank. I dont kniw whether its a tawny, a colheita, a LBV or a vintage. Nor do I know the age although it looks 1930s? Can anyone shed some light on tasting notes, history and potential value?

Thanks in advanceImage

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


Andy Velebil
Dow 1980
Posts: 2806
Joined: 22:16 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Los Angeles, Ca USA
Contact:

Re: Little known port identification

Post by Andy Velebil » 23:13 Fri 05 Feb 2021

Appears to be a 2 part mold bottle so not too terribly old.

I’d hazard a guess it’s a Ruby of some sort based on the “rich” part.

Value probably isn’t much. It was probably meant to drink decades ago. But should still be ok to drink just don’t expect greatness.

Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Re: RE: Re: Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 23:15 Fri 05 Feb 2021

Andy Velebil wrote:Appears to be a 2 part mold bottle so not too terribly old.

I’d hazard a guess it’s a Ruby of some sort based on the “rich” part.

Value probably isn’t much. It was probably meant to drink decades ago. But should still be ok to drink just don’t expect greatness.
Thanks Andy. I'll decant I suspect rather than cellar :)

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


Andy Velebil
Dow 1980
Posts: 2806
Joined: 22:16 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Los Angeles, Ca USA
Contact:

Re: Little known port identification

Post by Andy Velebil » 23:16 Fri 05 Feb 2021

Tom.herrick1987 wrote:
Andy Velebil wrote:Appears to be a 2 part mold bottle so not too terribly old.

I’d hazard a guess it’s a Ruby of some sort based on the “rich” part.

Value probably isn’t much. It was probably meant to drink decades ago. But should still be ok to drink just don’t expect greatness.
Thanks Andy. I'll decant I suspect rather than cellar :)

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk
Good call. Do let us know how it was when you drink it.

Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Re: RE: Re: Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 23:17 Fri 05 Feb 2021

Andy Velebil wrote:
Tom.herrick1987 wrote:
Andy Velebil wrote:Appears to be a 2 part mold bottle so not too terribly old.

I’d hazard a guess it’s a Ruby of some sort based on the “rich” part.

Value probably isn’t much. It was probably meant to drink decades ago. But should still be ok to drink just don’t expect greatness.
Thanks Andy. I'll decant I suspect rather than cellar :)

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk
Good call. Do let us know how it was when you drink it.
I'll get a decent selection of cheese in tomorrow, and give it a few hours of airing. Will do.

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


User avatar
Alex Bridgeman
Fonseca 1963
Posts: 12914
Joined: 13:41 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Berkshire, UK

Re: Little known port identification

Post by Alex Bridgeman » 23:23 Sat 06 Feb 2021

Please do post a pictur eor two of what the wine looks like when you pour it into a glass. These old rubies are a bit of fun to open as they are a snapshot of history, although a wine meant to be drunk shortly after being bottled.

Shorts was a London Wine merchant which was founded - as it says on the label - in 1726. It was still around in the years between the wars and vanished at some point after that. I can't figure out when.

I'd guess the bottle to be from the 1950s-1960s maybe.

Is there a back label?
Top Ports in 2019: Niepoort VV (1960s bottling) and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
Top Ports in 2020 (so far): Croft 1945 and Niepoort VV (1960s bottling)

Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Re: Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 23:34 Sat 06 Feb 2021

Hi alex, thanks for the info. There is a label on the back but nothing to note. Decanted it tonight but it is very murky. If it dropped bright i suspect more like a tawny. Sampled a mouthful. Very hot, licquorice, some clove, cloyingly sweet with a long finish but probably not very representative...

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


User avatar
JacobH
Dow 1980
Posts: 2748
Joined: 16:37 Sat 03 May 2008
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Little known port identification

Post by JacobH » 11:08 Sun 07 Feb 2021

Alex Bridgeman wrote:
23:23 Sat 06 Feb 2021
Shorts was a London Wine merchant which was founded - as it says on the label - in 1726. It was still around in the years between the wars and vanished at some point after that. I can't figure out when.
I had a look and reached the same conclusion about being unable to find out what happened to it. I had wondered if they had lost their building in the war but it looks like it was a survivor (unlike the next few buildings going West on the South side the street). It seems at some point it was a pub called “The Chancery” but that is a rather unhelpful name for easy research.
Image

Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Re: RE: Re: Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 12:25 Sun 07 Feb 2021

JacobH wrote:
Alex Bridgeman wrote:
23:23 Sat 06 Feb 2021
Shorts was a London Wine merchant which was founded - as it says on the label - in 1726. It was still around in the years between the wars and vanished at some point after that. I can't figure out when.
I had a look and reached the same conclusion about being unable to find out what happened to it. I had wondered if they had lost their building in the war but it looks like it was a survivor (unlike the next few buildings going West on the South side the street). It seems at some point it was a pub called “The Chancery” but that is a rather unhelpful name for easy research.
Thanks interesting. Many thanks! :)

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


User avatar
Alex Bridgeman
Fonseca 1963
Posts: 12914
Joined: 13:41 Mon 25 Jun 2007
Location: Berkshire, UK

Re: Little known port identification

Post by Alex Bridgeman » 17:45 Sun 07 Feb 2021

These old rubies or tawnies often develop a very, very fine sediment over the years. This stays in suspension for an annoyingly long time. In my experience it doesn't really affect the taste, but it does make the wine look cloudy.

Hot, liquorice, cloves, sweet doesn't sound that unexpected. Give it a couple of hours and the heat might disappear. Who knows? These old bottles are an absolute lottery - and all the more fun as a result.

I have a bottle of Smith Woodhouse Vintage Character Port which I'm guessing was filled in the early 1970s. You've inspired me to open it sometime this week.
Top Ports in 2019: Niepoort VV (1960s bottling) and Quinta do Noval Nacional 2017
Top Ports in 2020 (so far): Croft 1945 and Niepoort VV (1960s bottling)

Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Re: RE: Re: Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 20:54 Sun 07 Feb 2021

Alex Bridgeman wrote:These old rubies or tawnies often develop a very, very fine sediment over the years. This stays in suspension for an annoyingly long time. In my experience it doesn't really affect the taste, but it does make the wine look cloudy.

Hot, liquorice, cloves, sweet doesn't sound that unexpected. Give it a couple of hours and the heat might disappear. Who knows? These old bottles are an absolute lottery - and all the more fun as a result.

I have a bottle of Smith Woodhouse Vintage Character Port which I'm guessing was filled in the early 1970s. You've inspired me to open it sometime this week.
Hi alex, no it didnt. I often think like beer, we taste with our eyes and then with our nose before it even gets to our mouth. I'll give it a final day in the decanter before it gets enjoyed :) please do. Id be very interested how you get on!

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


Tom.herrick1987
Cruz Ruby
Posts: 8
Joined: 12:25 Thu 31 Dec 2020

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Little known port identification

Post by Tom.herrick1987 » 21:29 Sun 07 Feb 2021

Tom.herrick1987 wrote:
Alex Bridgeman wrote:These old rubies or tawnies often develop a very, very fine sediment over the years. This stays in suspension for an annoyingly long time. In my experience it doesn't really affect the taste, but it does make the wine look cloudy.

Hot, liquorice, cloves, sweet doesn't sound that unexpected. Give it a couple of hours and the heat might disappear. Who knows? These old bottles are an absolute lottery - and all the more fun as a result.

I have a bottle of Smith Woodhouse Vintage Character Port which I'm guessing was filled in the early 1970s. You've inspired me to open it sometime this week.
Hi alex, no it didnt. I often think like beer, we taste with our eyes and then with our nose before it even gets to our mouth. I'll give it a final day in the decanter before it gets enjoyed :) please do. Id be very interested how you get on!

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk
Left a day, dropped a good 5mm of sediment out and im glad I did leave it in the decanter a little longer. Phenolic taste has gone, hint of tobacco on the nose, date, fig and damson, medium to sweet finish. Very niceImageImage

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk


User avatar
jdaw1
Cockburn 1851
Posts: 22093
Joined: 15:03 Thu 21 Jun 2007
Location: London
Contact:

Re: Little known port identification

Post by jdaw1 » 22:40 Wed 10 Feb 2021

FWLIW, a 2018 book on Port Vintages has no mention of “Shorts” except in the cigar sense of “Partagas Shorts”.

User avatar
JacobH
Dow 1980
Posts: 2748
Joined: 16:37 Sat 03 May 2008
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Little known port identification

Post by JacobH » 15:18 Fri 12 Feb 2021

I saw that Vintage Wine and Port is selling a 1929 Vintage French Brandy from Short’s. A nice touch on the label is that they describe themselves as “Wine Merchants since the Reign of King George the First”!
Image

Post Reply