Taylors 1974 LBV

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tholt
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Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by tholt » 21:22 Sat 26 Dec 2015

I have been given a bottle of Taylors 1974 LBV. Has this any value, or should I just open it? Thanks

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DRT
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by DRT » 23:26 Sat 26 Dec 2015

Welcome to :tpf:

Your bottle has no particular value and is likely to be well past its best, even if it has been properly stored. Drinking it is the most sensible option.
"The first duty of Port is to be red"

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by JB vintage » 22:21 Sun 27 Dec 2015

Lucky you! It might very well be an excellent bottle of port! However, it has not much value (probably less than GBP 10 after expenses). Most people believe that LBV cannot age well but I know for a fact that they sometimes can. Even though LBV's are made to be perfectly drinkable at release, there is a fair chance that this bottle is still good or perhaps even very good. Less than 2 weeks ago I did try Taylor's LBV 1972 which was an excellent port with a character of an old vintage port.

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by Andy Velebil » 04:35 Mon 28 Dec 2015

It's a filtered LBV. So as DRT mentioned, it won't get better and is well past its best. That doesn't mean it isn't drinkable. As Port is pretty hardy even more basic ones can age....that doesn't mean it will get better though, but should remain drinkable.

I'd suggest opening it with others who may enjoy Port as a science project and hope for the best.

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by LGTrotter » 17:52 Mon 28 Dec 2015

Is there a definitive date as to when filtration and stabilisation became the norm? I suppose different shippers brought this in at different times. I thought that at this time it might be unfiltered.

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DRT
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by DRT » 18:51 Mon 28 Dec 2015

Taylor's was the first shipper to "commercialise" this style when they launched the 1965 LBV with the intention that it was ready to drink and did not require decanting. The TN's from this bottle that I opened at an LBV tasting reveal some of the qualities I would expect to see in the 1974 and also that the 1965 was filtered.
"The first duty of Port is to be red"

Ernest H. Cockburn

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by DaveRL » 20:42 Mon 28 Dec 2015

My only experience of older LBV is Taylor's 1994 last year. Drank well. Will hold a couple of years. Best wine match I've had with chocolate pudding. I'm inclined to agree that 1974 is a little old. Little value, open it and find out!

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AHB
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by AHB » 10:48 Tue 29 Dec 2015

Unless badly stored, the 1974 Taylor will be sweet and mature but perfectly enjoyable. Since it has very little value I'm another one who would recommend opening it and enjoying it with friends - or find a friend born on 1974 and open it with them. There's always something a bit special about drinking a wine that is as old as you are.
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Doggett
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by Doggett » 11:28 Tue 29 Dec 2015

AHB wrote:There's always something a bit special about drinking a wine that is as old as you are.
Even more true when you are a '63 boy Alex! :)

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uncle tom
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by uncle tom » 22:48 Tue 29 Dec 2015

It's a filtered LBV
True, but my experience of filtered Taylor ports from that decade suggests that the degree of filtration they deployed at the time was relatively modest. I'd say there's a better than evens chance that enough body was left in this wine to make it show well, even after four decades.

But the trade won't appreciate that, and it's market value is consequently low; so with New Year's Eve just a couple of days away, I'd say drink it - and enjoy!
I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I shall be sober and you will still be ugly - W.S. Churchill

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benread
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by benread » 16:53 Thu 31 Dec 2015

A producer once said to me that they applied just enough filtration to remove any dead flies! It was tongue in cheek but is exactly the point you make Tom.


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uncle tom
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by uncle tom » 02:03 Fri 01 Jan 2016

they applied just enough filtration to remove any dead flies!
That could be Oscar or Dirk I suspect..

The problem is that heavy filtration is favoured by some wine makers more than others, and that preference seems to transcend the need to maintain house styles.

From some of the major producers, a 10yr tawny from one decade can be perfectly mellow and aged, whilst one from the decade following can be dead in the water, just because the winemaker changed - or had an epiphany..

I would love to see the labelling of tawnies include some reference to filtration degree, but doubt it will ever happen..
I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I shall be sober and you will still be ugly - W.S. Churchill

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by Andy Velebil » 14:46 Sat 02 Jan 2016

uncle tom wrote:
they applied just enough filtration to remove any dead flies!
That could be Oscar or Dirk I suspect..

The problem is that heavy filtration is favoured by some wine makers more than others, and that preference seems to transcend the need to maintain house styles.

From some of the major producers, a 10yr tawny from one decade can be perfectly mellow and aged, whilst one from the decade following can be dead in the water, just because the winemaker changed - or had an epiphany..

I would love to see the labelling of tawnies include some reference to filtration degree, but doubt it will ever happen..
Like when you open and decant a 20 year (in bottle) tawny and there is zero sediment. You know it is heavily fined and/or filtered. :shock:

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by JB vintage » 13:26 Sun 03 Jan 2016

Are aged tawnies and Colheitas filtered? I have always thought that the sediment was removed naturally by the ageing process in wood. I can understand that young tawny would need filtering though but did not expect a 20 yo to be filtered.

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DRT
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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by DRT » 14:09 Sun 03 Jan 2016

In most instances these are filtered and/or fined before bottling. Some houses, such as Neipoort, do not filter or fine their Colheitas so they can be aged in bottle.
"The first duty of Port is to be red"

Ernest H. Cockburn

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Re: Taylors 1974 LBV

Post by Andy Velebil » 20:10 Sun 03 Jan 2016

DRT wrote:In most instances these are filtered and/or fined before bottling. Some houses, such as Neipoort, do not filter or fine their Colheitas so they can be aged in bottle.
Basically +1

Really dependent on the producer and what level of filtration they use. Anything from simply decanting off from barrel (essentially no filtering) to heavy fining and/or filtration.

For those that don't fine and/or filter, at some point after being bottled the Port will continue to drop sediment.

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